CHRISTMAS CARDS 2017

 

CHRISTMAS CARDS 2017

By Duncan

The history of Christmas cards goes all the way back to the year 1843, where the very first Christmas card on record was commissioned by Sir Henry Cole in England.

Henry was a civil servant (What that means is he was a Government Worker) who had helped set-up the new ‘Public Record Office’ (We now call the Post Office), where he was an Assistant Keeper, and wondered how the Post Office could be used more by ordinary people.

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SIR HENRY COLE

The illustrations of the first Christmas card, which depicted a family, including a small child, enjoying wine together, was created by the artist John Calcott Horsley.

Sir Henry had the idea for a Christmas Card and talked with his friend John Horsley, who was an artist. They designed the first card and sold them for 1 shilling each. (That is only 8 cents today), but in those days it was worth much, much more.) The card had three panels. The outer two panels showed people caring for the poor and in the center panel was a family having a large Christmas dinner! Some people didn’t like the center panel of the card because it showed a child being given a glass of wine! About 1000 (or it might have been less!) were printed and sold. These first cards are now very rare and cost thousands of dollars to if you wanted to buy one now.

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JOHN CALCOTT HORSLEY

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The Illustration and the concept of the Christmas card itself created a fair amount of controversy. Notice the small child drinking wine. The central picture showed three generations of a family raising a toast to the card’s recipient: on either side were scenes of charity, with food and clothing being given to the poor.

Christmas cards come in religious themes; they can also come in themes ranging from modern art to humorous and anything else imaginable. Surprisingly enough, the earliest Christmas cards were not often designed with a religious theme. The designs typically depicted cheerful colors and floral art to symbolize a celebration of the coming spring. The history of Christmas cards seems to have been mostly about the promise of hope.

As printing methods improved, Christmas cards became much more popular and were produced in large numbers from about 1860. In 1870 the cost of sending a postcard, and also Christmas cards, dropped to half a penny. This meant, even more, people were able to send cards.

The first cards usually had pictures of the Nativity scene on them. In late Victorian times, robins (an English bird) and snow-scenes became popular. In those times the postmen were nicknamed ‘Robin Postmen’ because of the red uniforms they wore. Snow-scenes were popular because they reminded people of the very bad winter that happened in the UK in 1836.

In 1915, J. C. Hall and two of his brothers created Hallmark Cards, who is still one of the biggest card makers today!

In 1928, the company adopted the name “Hallmark”, after the hallmark symbol used by goldsmiths in London in the 14th century, and began printing the name on the back of every card. In the same year, the company became the first in the greeting card industry to advertise their product nationally.

In 1944, Hallmark adopted its current slogan, “When you care enough to send the very best.” It was created by C. E. Goodman, a Hallmark marketing, and sales executive, and written on a 3×5 card. The original card is on display at the company headquarters. In 1951, Hall sponsored a television program for NBC that gave rise to the Hallmark Hall of Fame, which has won 80 Emmy Awards.

•An estimated 1.6 billion Christmas cards get sent every year.

•Approximately 33% of the holiday cards purchased each year contain a religious message.

•Christmas cards account for 60% of all card sales. The most popular Seasonal cards are Christmas cards, with some 1.6 billion units purchased (including boxed cards). This is followed by cards for Valentine’s Day (145 million units, not including classroom valentines), Mother’s Day (133 million units), Father’s Day (90 million units), Graduation (67 million units), Easter (57 million units), Halloween (21 million units), Thanksgiving (15 million units) and St. Patrick’s Day (7 million units).

•The U.S. is home to approximately 3,000 greeting card publishers.

•”Merry Christmas” is the preferred text for 54% of holiday card purchasers. “Season’s Greetings”, is liked by 12%, and “Happy Holidays” is preferred by 21%.

•When it comes to deciding which boxed card to buy, 56% of us make the decision based on the variety of cards available, and for 63%, the price is the most influential factor.

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J Hoover Lith Christmas Eve 1880 Christmas Eve by J Edgar H (1880)

As each Christmas comes and goes I’ve noticed there are a few people who send me a Christmas card every year without fail even if I forgot to send them one. Some years I didn’t bother with the card, envelope or the stamp. In the last few years, I haven’t even bothered to put up a tree.

The Christmas cards start slow and then build and the closer we get to Christmas they become a trickle the last few days before Christmas.

I know my son tapes his Christmas cards to several walls in his home for everyone to see.  It’s fun looking at all of his Christmas Cards.

For years I have shared my Christmas cards online. I thought I would do it again this year.

Before we look at the cards I received this year, I decided to post the Christmas Cards of our Presidents.

While it may be less common these days to send a holiday greeting via snail mail, the White House has yet to let go of its 90-year tradition.

Starting with Calvin Coolidge in 1927, the long-standing practice allows each sitting US president to let their staff and supporters know they wish them a happy holiday. Each card is unique, and recipients change from year to year.

1927 - calvin-coolidge-1927

CALVIN COOLIDGE  –  1927

1931 HOOVER 03

HERBERT HOOVER –  1931

1932 herbert-hoover-1932

HERBERT HOOVER  –  1932

1933 franklin-roosevelt-1933

PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT  –  1933

1934 franklin-roosevelt-1934

PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT  –  1934

1935 franklin-roosevelt-1935

PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT  –  1935

1936 franklin-roosevelt-1936

PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT   –  1936

1937 franklin-roosevelt-1937

PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT  –  1937

1941 franklin-roosevelt-1941

PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT  –  1941

1942 franklin-roosevelt-1942

PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT  –  1942

1943 franklin-roosevelt-1943

PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT   –  1943

1944 franklin-roosevelt-1944

PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT  –  1945

1945 harry-s-truman-1945

PRESIDENT TRUMAN  –  1945

1946 harry-s-truman-1946

PRESIDENT TRUMAN  –  1946

1950 harry-s-truman-1950

PRESIDENT TRUMAN  –  1950

1951 harry-s-truman-1951

PRESIDENT TRUMAN  –  1951

1952 harry-s-truman-1952

PRESIDENT TRUMAN  –  1952

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PRESIDENT  EISENHOWER   –   1953.

1954 dwight-d-eisenhower-1954

PRESIDENT EISENHOWER  –  1954

1956 dwight-d-eisenhower-1956

PRESIDENT EISENHOWER  –  1956

1957 dwight-d-eisenhower-1957

PRESIDENT EISENHOWER  –  1957

1959 dwight-d-eisenhower-1959

PRESIDENT EISENHOWER  –  1959

1961 john-f-kennedy-1961

PRESIDENT KENNEDY  –  1961

1962 john-f-kennedy-1962

PRESIDENT KENNEDY  –  1962

1963 john-f-kennedy-1963

PRESIDENT KENNEDY   –  1963

1964 lyndon-b-johnson-1964

PRESIDENT JOHNSON  –  1964

1965 lyndon-b-johnson-1965

PRESIDENT JOHNSON  –  1965

1966 lyndon-b-johnson-1966

PRESIDENT JOHNSON   –  1966

1967 lyndon-b-johnson-1967

PRESIDENT JOHNSON 1967

1968 lyndon-b-johnson-1968

PRESIDENT JOHNSON  –  1968

1969 richard-nixon-1969

PRESIDENT  NIXON   –  1969

1970 richard-nixon-1970

PRESIDENT NIXON   –  1970

1971 richard-nixon-1971

PRESIDENT NIXON  –  1971

1972 richard-nixon-1972

PRESIDENT NIXON   –  1972

1973 richard-nixon-1973

PRESIDENT   –  1973

1974 gerald-ford-1974

PRESIDENT FORD  –  1974

1975 gerald-ford-1975

PRESIDENT FORD  –  1975

1976 gerald-ford-1976

PRESIDENT FORD  –  1976

1976 jimmy-carter-1978

PRESIDENT CARTER   –  1976

1977 jimmy-carter-1977

PRESIDENT CARTER  –  1977

1981 ronald-reagan-1981

PRESIDENT REAGAN   –  1981

1982 ronald-reagan-1982

PRESIDENT REAGON   –  1982

1983 ronald-reagan-1983

PRESIDENT REAGAN   –  1983

1984 ronald-reagan-1984

PRESIDENT REAGAN  1984

1985 ronald-reagan-1985

PRESIDENT REAGAN  –  1985

1986 ronald-reagan-1986

PRESIDENT REAGAN  –  1986

1987 ronald-reagan-1987

PRESIDENT REAGAN  –  1987

1988 ronald-reagan-1988

PRESIDENT REAGAN   –  1988

1991 george-h-w-bush-1991

PRESIDENT  H. W.  BUSH  –  1991

1992 george-h-w-bush-1992

PRESIDENT  H. W.  BUSH  –  1992

1993 bill-clinton-1993

PRESIDENT CLINTON  –   1993

1994 bill-clinton-1994

PRESIDENT CLINTON  –  1994

1995 bill-clinton-1995

PRESIDENT CLINTON  –  1995

1996 bill-clinton-1996

PRESIDENT CLINTON  –  1996

1997 bill-clinton-1997

PRESIDENT CLINTON  –  1997

1998 bill-clinton-1998

PRESIDENT CLINTON  –  1998

1999 bill-clinton-1999

PRESIDENT CLINTON  –  1999

2000 bill-clinton-2000

PRESIDENT CLINTON  –  2000

2001 george-w-bush-2001

PRESIDENT BUSH   –  2001

2003 BUSH 2003

PRESIDENT BUSH  –  2003

2004 - BUSH

PRESIDENT BUSH  –  2005

2005 - BUSH d85004ff37e92a3984acffa151fb9842--holiday-cards-christmas-cards

PRESIDENT BUSH   –  2005

2008 george-w-bush-2008

PRESIDENT BUSH  –  2008

2009 barack-obama-2009

PRESIDENT OBAMA   –  2009

2011 barack-obama-2011

PRESIDENT OBAMA  –  2011

2013 barack-obama-2013

PRESIDENT OBAMA  –  2013

2012 barack-obama-2012

PRESIDENT OBAMA   –  2012

2016 xmasobamas2016

PRESIDENT OBAMAN  –  2016

2017 trumps-christmas-portrait-2017

PRESIDENT TRUMP —  2017

It’s been cold all over the United States this first day of 2018.  Even Southwest Florida is having its share of cool weather. I had to pull out the long pants and the sweater/jacket today. At night while much of the north are experiencing sub-zero weather, we are still in the mid 50’s at night.

This is my fourth year of posting my Christmas cards. Typically, if I were in a total Christmas meltdown, I would have lights and a tree and decorations all over the house. But, it’s a little tough to get entirely carried away with Christmas in warm Southwest Florida.  So, with that in mind, below are the Christmas cards from all over the United States. Below is the batch I received this year.

DUNCAN S S S C JGREG AND BARB TULLHEINBAUGHJACK AND MARTHAJIM AND DEB CHAGARESJIM AND JAN GENTRYJUDY AND JIM WHITEK HPHILLPPE FUGERERICHARD AND STEVERICK AND JULIE CIMININILLOROAD TALESTHE BUESCHERSTHE CVELICH FAMILYTHE FINLEY'STHE FOXTHE HOOK FAMILYTHE KUNTZ FAMILYTHE MILLERSTONY VISCOVI

ALAN AND NANCY BAILEY - PRATTARRON KOENIGBOB MASONCHARLIE GAVITCHRISTY GRIMMENSTEINDOT PHILLIPS

DUNCAN GTS

About the author

Stephen A and Scott Duncan publish "ByDuncan.com" Scott photographs (Duncan Photography) and is the guy who keeps this site running. Steve (left) is a photographer (Duncan Photography) and writes to "ByDuncan.com"